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Monthly Archives: May 2011

Month 5:11 “Moon of the Spice Route”

SELENE #4
“Moon of the Spice Route”
(last revised 25 May 2011)

By way of boughs
& harps of cinnamon bark.
Cardamom choir, wan clarinets,
doubled chorus of cloves buffing mace.
Percussion: one nutmeg
whole then split apart,
finely ground. Loud.

by Therese L. Broderick 

To learn more about the Selene, see this blog’s post for “Month 5:7.”     

Month 5:10 “Approaching Fifty-Two”

APPROACHING FIFTY-TWO

At dawn, too many birdsongs
to count up, flickering like the flames
of assorted used candles perched
on my recent birthday cakes.

Some songs hearty, others feeble, yet I’d bet
a bougie they’re not even praising the sun,
that fresh lemon confection. More likely
they boast, warn, threaten —
each ignition of throat a petty arson.

But just as a life can get better as it grows longer
a single day can too. When sun peaks
birds go quiet, infernal alarms snuffed
out, each beak shut
like my fingers pinching a wick.

by Therese L. Broderick
poem last revised June 1, 2011

Month 5:9 “Moon of the Light Rain”

SELENE #3
“Moon of the Light Rain”
16 May 2011

Morning rain
so light we know no name
lighter than its own sky play
against a boy’s yellow kite tail,
against a Schwinn’s handlebar stream-
ers. No aptonym’s precipita-
tion briefer than its eighth
of a split-second take
on Schuyler’s face.

 

What is a SELENE? A poetic form invented by Therese L. Broderick (this blogger) which waxes and wanes — like Selene, the Moon —  in line lengths and in terminal vowel pitches. For a more detailed explanation, see this blog’s entry for “Month 5:7.” 

Month 5:8 “Moon of the Magnolias”

SELENE #2
“Moon of the Magnolias”
(revised 25 May 2011)

Heart murmurs
in panorama, vista
of trespassed grasses.
Petal fall — layering percale
damp from rain (flooding locks, levees,
remnant culverts). Cultivate, cultivate
tresses of Mayo’s lasses.
Yews shall layette the
pulsing furls.

What is a SELENE?   A poetic form invented by Therese L. Broderick (this blogger) which waxes and wanes — like Selene, the Moon —  in line lengths and in terminal vowel pitches. For a more detailed explanation, see this blog’s entry for “Month 5:7.” 

Month 5:7 “Moon of the Homemade Paper”

SELENE #1
“Moon of the  Homemade Paper”
1 May 2011 

Brew
of shorn
nuptials, plushed.
Quill, graph, roller mate.
Arbor-tration to consistency,
to the slurry’s pale.
Take thee gum
forsworn
by June.

What is a SELENE?

1) a poetry form invented by Therese L. Broderick (this blogger) which re-combines features of envelope verse, of vowel rhyme, and of the pendeka

2) a poetry form which suggests the waxing & waning of our Moon

3) a poetry form whose final (per line) vowel sounds wax & wane 


4) a poetry form whose lines (per stanza) wax & wane

5) a word which is a Greek goddess name for “Moon”; a word related to “Luna”; a word related to “selenite”, “selenodesy” , “selenography” , and “selenology”

Additional Notes to #1-5 above:

1) It’s almost impossible for a poet to be entirely original; therefore, I doubt that I have  invented an entirely new poetic form. If you are aware of any other moon-inspired poetry forms, please leave a comment on this blog.

2) Here in the Northern Hemisphere, I see the moon wax from right to left, then wane from right to left; therefore, I compose these Selene poems flush-right on the page.

3) In a Selene, vowel sounds wax & wane in any of these physical ways: in pitch; in loudness; in duration; in rounding of lips; in height of tongue; in area of mouth where the sound is made, etc.

4) In a Selene, lines wax & wane in any of these physical ways: in length of printed text; in syllable count; in number of beats; in duration of breath, etc.

5) The vowel sound of “Lune” or “moon” is the lowest pitch in a pendeka; the vowel sound of “lene” in “Selene” is the highest pitch in a pendeka. A pendeka is a poem or memory aid which takes the voice up and down a scale of fifteen English vowels.