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#1-6 NaPoWriMo

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APRIL 6 — Here is my poem #6 for National Poetry Writing Month, composed in response to a prompt on ReadWritePoem: write about favorite images. Instead, this poem is about my least favorite images, very tragic images on nightly television.
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HERE IN SILENCE ARE THREE MORE
(after the PBS NewsHour)
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WWWWWWWWWWWWWWW
WWWWWWWWWWWWWWW
WWWWWWWWWWWWWWW
WWWWWWWWWWWWWWW
WWWWWWWWWWWWWWW
WWWWWWWWWWWWWWW
WWWWWWWWWWWWWWW
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AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA
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RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
RRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRRR
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APRIL 4 — Here is my poem #4 for National Poetry Writing Month. This  inside/out  haiku of 7/5/7 syllables was written in response to a prompt on ReadWritePoem: write an inside/out poem. This piece was inspired by my young nephew who performs well at both indoor poetry and outdoor sports.

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In the hooped Easter basket —

a new basketball

ready for the hoop outside.

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APRIL 3 — Here is my poem #3 for National Poetry Writing Month, composed in response to a prompt posted on ReadWritePoem : write about something that scares you. This poem was written quickly from a hotel in Maine before checking out. (Later note from poet: poem has been revised and critiqued since first composition.)
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BANGOR
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On this first trip to Maine, a new danger
of hitting something rare on the roadway,
slamming into a moose — not just any moose
but a female ready to birth, and not just any
roadway but this northern route on the way to
a college quad with my daughter beside me,
how her freshman’s thrill at moving far
away from the safety of home might be
killed by something so large and raw
as a wounded animal in a strange place,
something too new for a word. I dread
how soon she must learn to name it.
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APRIL 2 — Here is my poem #2 for National Poetry Month, composed in response to a prompt posted on ReadWritePoem: write a poem using the initials RWP. This poem was written quickly, as I am en route from New York State through Massachusetts to Maine.
(Later note from poet: poem has been revised since first composition.)
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REVISITING WARNER POND
(Concord, MA)
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Heavy rains came, bringing the widening pond
up to the back door of this Warner St. home.
All last night, a white pipe pumped water
out of the cellar, pouring from sunset to sunrise
even as one blazing blue jay in a wet tree
near my bedroom window puffed his chest, pulsed
his cry four times in a row, four times again.
Bird gushing, water gushing, and I am the guest
of all this good fortune, showered in blue.
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I
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APRIL 1 — Here is my poem #1 for National Poetry Writing Month, composed in response to a prompt posted on ReadWritePoem. This poem uses  terms indicating the first five movements from a Bach suite on the music CD entitled Style Brise: The Broken Style with archguitarist Peter Blanchette. The five terms are: Prelude, Allemande, Courante, Sarabande. and Menuets. (Later note from poet: poem has been revised since first composition.)
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…………………………COURANTE
……………………….. Every evening on my walk I hear them
…………………………before I see them — low airplanes
…………………………from the east or south passing over
…………………………Woodlawn and Partridge and Main,
…………………………descending to the nearby airport
…………………………with trebbling engines, prelude
…………………………to any sight of them above the trees —
…………………………small commuters from LaGuardia or
…………………………long sleek cabins from distant lands
…………………………of sarabandes and allemandes. Inside them
…………………………sit some of my neighbors heading home to
…………………………kids and jobs, to our common courante
…………………………on the ground: winter, spring, summer,
…………………………fall. We all still replay in our minds
…………………………Buffalo’s recent losses, how that plane
…………………………glazing with too much ice lurched
…………………………then fell to rooftops, its slender wings
…………………………and fuselage tilting and tipping
…………………………as if in measure to a minuet. When I stop
…………………………on the sidewalk and look up, turning
…………………………and turning in one spot beneath
…………………………those bellies headed for a soft landing,
…………………………I cannot help but hum, wave them all on.
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…………………………by Therese L. Broderick
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About ThereseLBroderick

Independent community poet living in Albany, New York USA.

26 responses »

  1. Thanks, Therese. Very polished. I’ll be back. You’ll find my work at http://www.gregoconnell.com. Regards, Greg.

  2. i really thought this was lovely. i couldn;t quite get into the courante in the main piece but i could see what you were doing with it. i love those first four lines tho…

  3. Well done.

    Moody but playful narrative with nice interior rhymes.

    Regards,
    Doug

  4. Therese,
    I love this poem and the storytelling that you do here. Excellent!
    Pamela

  5. Well done. Got really drawn in by the reference to the horrible Buffalo tragedy.

  6. I really love your take on this prompt. Beautiful!

  7. very nice indeed Therese….do not recognize music…but nice shuffle for sure

  8. the dancing sounds make an interesting contrast to the idea of the crash

  9. Revisiting Warmer Pond
    Beautiful imagery captured in a small snapshot poem.

  10. I really enjoyed Revisiting Warner Pond. Thank you :)

  11. Hi Therese,

    How nice that you could interpret a flood as being washed with bounty, along with the birdsong. I also enjoyed your first piece and the way you applied exotic musical terms to scenes of daily life.

  12. Day 2 RWP poem is so good – very sensual.

  13. Hi, Therese. Love the vivid phrase “pulsed his cry”. Check out “Avid readers” at http://www.gregoconnell.com =)

  14. Nice prompt, and good work – keep the NaPoWriMo train rollin’…
    …rob
    Image & Verse

  15. Great use of alliteration.

  16. I enjoyed your acronym prompt, thanks for the inspiration.

    “Revisiting Warner Pond” is lovely. The pairing of the blue jay and the pump is beautiful. SOo much around us.

  17. Hi Therese,

    Hitting a moose could do much more than kill your daughters “young fearlessness”. A very real horror.

  18. All three are wonderful, but I like the moose one the best. It’s such a complicated and cerebral fear, totally unique and understandably deep. The last lines are fantastic!

  19. that is scarry….we have wildlife all over the highways here….i clipped an Elk a couple of years…..thanks for sharing this

  20. Hi, Therese. Enjoyed your haiku. My latest ‘Griefsong’ is on my website. =)

  21. Therese,
    Wonderful writing for #5.
    Pamela

  22. Therese, They are all wonderful. In fact, you’ve inspired me to try to write a few poems of my own! I plan to keep up with your April challenge. I’ll be checking out RWP, too. By the way, my favorite is Sestina.

  23. i had to laugh abt the census form… big brotherhood lingers… tho her house is filled with beautiful words…. file and forget

  24. good one Therese…thanks for sharing

  25. Therese, napomwrimo #6
    Wow! That is something! You are brilliant!
    Pamela

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