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Monthly Archives: March 2010

NaPoWriMo

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National Poetry Writing Month is observed during National Poetry Month each April. I have pledged to write one new poem per day from April 1-30.

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Check back here for the poems!

 

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“Nicaragua”

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This prose poem uses one phrase from an email from my 17-year old daughter: “Muy adorables.” I have her permission to include that phrase in this prose poem. For more details about this prose poem, see the Writer’s Statement as the first comment. This version of the poem benefits from feedback of several first readers.

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…………..NICARAGUA
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……………Hadn’t her doctor said, no need for one more vaccine? But still
……………I fret about teeming islands and lakes, breeding trees. Rodents
……………she wouldn’t hear above the heat. A lone mosquito. In her email
……………from Managua: how she loves the local children. Muy adorables. 
……………She takes to their language, a jungle of flickering tongues, bites,
……………golden young. She wants to eat plantains, to bring back north
……………a hammock.

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……………by Therese L. Broderick

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ReadWritePoem #117

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This poem is written in response to prompt #117 on ReadWritePoem: combine a passage about grief with an unrelated passage about theft (in this poem, the two passages are closely related). I have my husband’s consent to publish this poem. This scene is slightly fictionalized; for details, see the Writer’s Statement as the first comment. This version of the poem benefits from the feedback of first readers RL, JG, and JH.
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…………………………STEALING AWAY
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…………………………The funeral for your old friend is as hard
…………………………as any I can remember —  a wet morning,
…………………………a widow standing beside two brave sons,
…………………………and dozens of visitors filing past the casket.
…………………………Afterwards in the car, I ask you to take me
…………………………on the long route home, to drive ten extra miles
…………………………down Columbia Turnpike and Hays Road
…………………………to the small brick house I had known as a girl,
…………………………to the driveway where a quiet ambulance
…………………………had opened its doors twenty-eight years before.
…………………………You stop the car near the front lawn and I
…………………………weep and weep, crying in memory of my
…………………………father’s long illness, of the years it had stolen
…………………………from me, and of what I’ve just stolen from you:
…………………………one day of grief to claim as all your own,
…………………………with a strong abiding woman by your side.

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…………………………by Therese L. Broderick

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